Physical Disabilities

Disabled people are often talked about as though they form one group. But every disabled person faces different challenges and health conditions.

 

Physical Disability Care

As well as providing day-to-day personal care, the Pride & Dignity Care team can offer the motivation, support and encouragement needed to maintain a customer’s independence. 

Our sensitive, caring team can offer the motivation, support and encouragement needed to maintain as much independence as possible. We understand the need to be listened to, to have wishes and options considered, and to be able to make one`s own life decisions, whether big or small. Even in the face of severe disability, we can help the individual live a full and enjoyable life.

Anyone who is assessed with a disability, either through illness or injury, accident or a worsening medical condition, will invariably need a degree of personal support: family and friends may find themselves in a caring role, one which often may have a detrimental effect on relationships. From years of experience working with disabled service users, we understand the need to be listened to, to have wishes and options considered, and to be able to make one’s own decisions.

We work with disabled adults of all ages, in the customer’s home and in the wider community including the workplace, and college. Pride & Dignity Care are positive about disabled people and, even in the face of severe disability, we can help the customer live a positive and purposeful life. We focus on the most important aspects of the service user’s care, whilst never forgetting to ensure our service provision places your pride and dignity at the forefront.

The Equality Act 2010 defines a disabled person as anyone who has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out day-to-day activities. These impairments include:

Older people are more likely to develop a disability and most disabled people are adults. More than 11 million people in the UK are disabled, around 6% of whom are children.

More people are living with a disability now than in the past because we’re living longer, and improved medical treatments are enabling more people to manage long-term health problems.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission says that 58% of people over 50 will have a long-term health condition by 2020.

Support for living independently

Disabilities of any kind present challenges, but this doesn’t mean that life with a disability can’t be fulfilling.

For most people, a fulfilling life means having control over their day-to-day activities and being able to choose how they live.

More than 1 million disabled people live alone in the UK, and many more lead independent lives with help. To learn more about independent living with a disability, read the article on Disability and independent life.

For a lot of people, independent life also means being employed. Half of the UK’s disabled people are in jobs, but it should be more. ReadWork and disability to learn more.

Only 17% of disabled people are born with their disability. Most disabled people have had to adjust to their disability as adults. You can learn more about this in Adjusting to disability.

Caring for carers

It’s not just disabled people who are challenged by disability, but also the people who care for them. The term “carer” describes people who care for others on an unpaid basis, as opposed to people who are paid, such as care workers and home helps.

There are 6.5 million carers in the UK. If you’re one of them, you may be entitled to support, such as help with caring, home adaptations and equipment, and short breaks from caring.